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Parliamentary Debates and Questions

S5W-22096: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 13 March 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it considers an individual should take if he or she is profoundly dissatisfied with the treatment of a loved one by the NHS.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 26 March 2019

The new NHS Complaints Handling Procedure (CHP) was introduced across Scotland from 1 April 2017. The revised procedure is intended to support a more consistently person-centred approach to complaints handling across NHS Scotland. It brings a much sharper focus to the early, local resolution of complaints, wherever that’s appropriate, and brought the NHS into line with other public service sectors by introducing a distinct, five working day stage for early, local resolution, ahead of the 20 working day stage for complaint investigations. When that is not possible the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) is the second and final stage in the complaints process.

When a person has concerns about NHS treatment or care this should be addressed at a local level through the NHS Complaints Handling Procedure (CHP). The Patient Rights (Scotland) Act 2011 and supporting legislation, provides a specific right for people to make complaints, raise concerns, make comments and give feedback to NHS Boards. The Act also places a duty on NHS Boards to thoroughly investigate and respond to any concerns raised, to take improvement actions where appropriate and to share learning from the views they receive. Where an individual remains dissatisfied with the outcome of the CHP investigation, the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) is the second and final stage in the complaints process.