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Debates and questions

These are the official transcripts of what people said in:

  • the Chamber the place where Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) meet to debate and make decisions
  • committee meetings - committees are small groups of Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) from different political parties

This part of the website also includes written questions and answers. 

Debates and Questions Listing

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Chamber

Official transcripts of what MSPs said in the Chamber. This is the place where all MSPs meet to debate and make decisions.

Meeting of the Parliament 27 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

General Question Time, First Minister’s Question Time.

Meeting of the Parliament 26 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Portfolio Question Time, Citizens Assembly of Scotland, Tackling Child Poverty (Progress Report), Tenement Maintenance, Transvaginal Mesh, Poverty and Inequality Commission, Business Motions, Parliamentary Bureau Motions, Point of Order, Decision Time, UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights Report.

Meeting of the Parliament 25 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Time for Reflection, Topical Question Time, Education Reforms, Business Motion, Management of Offenders (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3, Management of Offenders (Scotland) Bill, Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body, Decision Time, Aircraft Noise (Health).

Meeting of the Parliament 20 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Business Motion, General Question Time, First Minister’s Question Time, Glasgow School of Art Fire, Planning (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3 (Day 3), Portfolio Question Time, Provisional Outturn 2018-19, Gender Recognition Act 2004 Review, Planning (Scotland) Bill, Business Motion, Decision Time.

Meeting of the Parliament 19 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Mental Health (Young People Entering and in Custody), Portfolio Question Time, Planning (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3 (Day 2), Business Motions, Parliamentary Bureau Motion, Decision Time, Point of Order, Children and Young People (Health-harming Products).

Meeting of the Parliament 18 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Time for Reflection, Topical Question Time, Portfolio Question Time, Cycling Action Plan, Business Motion, Planning (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3, Business Motion, Parliamentary Bureau Motion, Decision Time, Unforgotten Forces Consortium.

Meeting of the Parliament 13 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

General Question Time, First Minister’s Question Time, World Environment Day 2019, Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body Question Time, Portfolio Question Time, Disclosure (Scotland) Bill, Restricted Roads (20 mph Speed Limit) (Scotland) Bill: Stage 1, Wild Animals in Circuses (No 2) Bill, Point of Order, Decision Time.

Meeting of the Parliament 12 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Lung Health, Portfolio Question Time, Scottish Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2017, Veterans Strategy (Update), Census (Amendment) (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3, Business Motion, Parliamentary Bureau Motion, Decision Time, Housing Co-operatives.

Meeting of the Parliament 11 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Time for Reflection, Topical Question Time, Primary 1 Standardised Assessments, Fuel Poverty (Targets, Definition and Strategy) (Scotland) Bill, Human Tissue (Authorisation) (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3, Human Tissue (Authorisation) (Scotland) Bill, Standing Orders (Rules Changes), Decision Time, The Way of St Andrews.

Meeting of the Parliament 06 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Business Motion, General Question Time, First Minister’s Question Time, First Responders (Trauma Recovery and Support), Portfolio Question Time, Business Motion, Fuel Poverty (Target, Definition and Strategy) (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3.

Meeting of the Parliament 05 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Sustainable Aquaculture, Portfolio Question Time, Business Motion, South of Scotland Enterprise Bill: Stage 3, South of Scotland Enterprise Bill, Business Motion, Parliamentary Bureau Motions, Decision Time, Child Safety Week 2019.

Meeting of the Parliament 04 June 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Time for Reflection, Topical Question Time, Whole-life Custody Sentences, Realising Scotland’s Potential, Decision Time, Dementia (Alzheimer Scotland Report).

Meeting of the Parliament 30 May 2019

The agenda for the day:

General Question Time, First Minister’s Question Time, Edinburgh Festivals (Effect of Immigration Policy), Portfolio Question Time, Medium-term Financial Strategy, A Trading Nation, Point of Order, Decision Time.

Meeting of the Parliament 29 May 2019

The agenda for the day:

Next Steps in Scotland’s Future, Portfolio Question Time, Wind Turbine Construction (Fife), Business Motion, Decision Time, Expanding Scotland’s Railways.

Meeting of the Parliament 28 May 2019 [Draft]

The agenda for the day:

Time for Reflection, Topical Question Time, Children (Equal Protection from Assault) (Scotland) Bill: Stage 1, Business Motion, Decision Time, Universal Credit and Mental Health.

Meeting of the Parliament 22 May 2019

The agenda for the day:

Business Support Inquiry, Mental Health Services (Quality and Safety), General Question Time, First Minister’s Question Time, Business Motion, Parliamentary Bureau Motion, Decision Time, Local Radio.

Meeting of the Parliament 21 May 2019

The agenda for the day:

Time for Reflection, Topical Question Time, Portfolio Question Time, Menopause, Business Motion, Decision Time, International Museum Day 2019.

Meeting of the Parliament 16 May 2019

The agenda for the day:

General Question Time, First Minister’s Question Time, Community Pharmacy Scotland, Portfolio Question Time, Brexit (Impact on Food and Drink), Decision Time.

Meeting of the Parliament 15 May 2019

The agenda for the day:

Portfolio Question Time, Treatment Time Guarantee, Education, Point of Order, Business Motions, Parliamentary Bureau Motions, Decision Time, Foster Care Fortnight.

Meeting of the Parliament 14 May 2019

The agenda for the day:

Time for Reflection, Topical Question Time, Global Climate Emergency, Sheep Farming, The Place Principle, Committee Announcement, Decision Time, Home-Start Glenrothes 21st Anniversary.

Committee

Transcripts of committee meetings are uploaded as soon as they've been checked for accuracy. This may be a few days after the meeting has taken place.

Committee on the Scottish Government Handling of Harassment Complaints

Culture, Tourism, Europe and External Affairs Committee

Delegated Powers and Law Reform Committee

Economy, Energy and Fair Work Committee

Education and Skills Committee

Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform Committee

Equalities and Human Rights Committee

Finance and Constitution Committee

Health and Sport Committee

Justice Committee

Justice Sub-Committee on Policing

Local Government and Communities Committee

Public Audit and Post-legislative Scrutiny Committee

Public Petitions Committee

Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee

Social Security Committee

Standards, Procedures and Public Appointments Committee

Questions

These are questions that MSPs have asked the Scottish Government about its work. It also includes any answers to these questions.

S5W-24216: Jenny Gilruth (Mid Fife and Glenrothes)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 3 July 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, following the resignation of the chair, Dr Dame Denise Coia, when it will provide an update on the future of the Children and Young People’s Mental Health Taskforce, and when it will publish the taskforce's recommendations.

Answered by: Clare Haughey on 4 July 2019

Answered by: Clare Haughey 4 July 2019

I anticipate that the first meeting of the new Board will take place in August 2019.

Membership of the Board will include representatives of NHS Chief Executives; Local Authority Chief Executives (SOLACE); Integration Joint Board Chief Officers; Directors of Education and Children’s Services (ADES); Social Work Scotland; the Royal College of GPs; the Royal College of Nursing; the Association of Educational Psychologists, Directors of Public Health, the Third Sector; other allied health professionals, youth workers and parents (NPF). We will also make use of the services of a participation officer whose role will be to make the appropriate links with children and young people to ensure that a level of co-production applies and their voices are at the centre.

We are very grateful to Dr Dame Denise Coia for her considered and collaborative work in leading the Taskforce and her strong guiding presence. We are also grateful to all of the Taskforce and workstream members who gave their time, energy and commitment.

This announcement today reflects the next steps in a partnership between the Scottish Government and COSLA aimed at making sure that our children and young people and their families are able to get the right support at the right time from specialist mental health services and community support services. The Taskforce’s vision will guide our approach to making real change. In line with their recommendations, there will be a focus on prevention, early intervention and promoting good mental health. This will be underpinned by the values and principles of GIRFEC and will be responsive to local needs and systems.

The Board, which will be jointly chaired by the Scottish Government Director of Mental Health and the COSLA Head of Policy, will report directly to me and the COSLA Health and Social Care, and Children and Young People spokespersons. The scope of the Board’s work, with an emphasis on delivery and action between now and the end of 2020, will be to oversee reforms. The scope will include relevant areas of education, health, community and children’s services and wider areas that impact on the mental health and wellbeing of children. This will include the recommendations of the Taskforce and the Youth Commission on Mental Health.

I can today announce, on behalf of the Scottish Government and COSLA, that the work of the Children & Young People’s Mental Health Taskforce will be taken forward by a new programme board – the Children & Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing Programme Board .

S5W-24154: Maureen Watt (Aberdeen South and North Kincardine)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 2 July 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it met the EU threshold target of paying at least 95.24% of the total value of valid pillar 1 schemes applications by the 30 June 2019 date.

Answered by: Fergus Ewing on 3 July 2019

Answered by: Fergus Ewing 3 July 2019

Scheme

Value Paid (£ Millions)   

% progress of payments value made

Pillar 1

  

BPS / Greening / YFP

387.25

96.82

SSBSS

38.63

96.09

SUSSS

6.62

95.83

Pillar 2

  

LFASS

63.89

95.40

 

In total £516.9 million has been paid out through all of our rural support schemes by 30 June 2019 which is 18% more compared to the same time last year.

The Scottish Government has also paid 95.40% of value of LFASS (less favoured areas support scheme) applications, this is several months earlier than last year and ahead of our payment schedule deadline.

£432.5 million

I can confirm that the Scottish Government did meet the EU threshold target of paying at least 95.24% before the 30 June 2019 for all 5 pillar 1 schemes. By the 30 June 2019 we had paid:

S5W-24085: Keith Brown (Clackmannanshire and Dunblane)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 1 July 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre, which is in the Clackmannanshire and Dunblane constituency, has delivered to support the Farmed Fish Health Framework.

Answered by: Fergus Ewing on 2 July 2019

Answered by: Fergus Ewing 2 July 2019

Since its inception in 2014, the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre has made a major contribution to applied research and development into fish health and welfare. Today I issued a letter on behalf of the Farmed Fish Health Steering Group to the Convenors of the Rural Economy and Connectivity and Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform committees which outlines much of that detail. I do though wish to commend the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre, as they come towards the end of the first phase of five year funding, for making offers of £743,000 to support five new fish health projects directly aligned to the Farmed Fish Health Framework worth £2m. Those projects will contribute to delivering our 10 year plan, and I look forward to seeing the results of the applied research emerge over time.

S5W-24088: Emma Harper (South Scotland)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 1 July 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will provide an update on the timing of the next Inpatient Experience Survey.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 2 July 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 2 July 2019

The next wave of the Inpatient Experience Survey will commence in mid-2020, with fieldwork starting in early 2021. The Inpatient Experience Survey is one of four patient experience surveys carried out by the Scottish Government. The timings of this survey have been amended to avoid an overlap with the Health and Care Experience Survey fieldwork which commences at the end of 2019. Changing the timing of the Inpatient Survey by a year will provide a better balance to the wider Scottish Care Experience Programme, minimising the pressure on participants who may be asked to contribute to more than one experience survey and consequently may improve response rates.

S5W-24064: Mark Ruskell (Mid Scotland and Fife)

Scottish Green Party

Date lodged: 27 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will confirm details of the publication of the civil contingency preparedness review of nuclear warhead transportation by HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and HM Fire Service Inspectorate.

Answered by: Ash Denham on 28 June 2019

Answered by: Ash Denham 28 June 2019

I believe the recommendations and suggestions that are included in the report will reassure Parliament and our communities that our responder agencies are well prepared and the findings of this report will further enhance preparedness, so that Scotland is indeed ready.

 

The report is published on the Scottish Government website at www.gov.scot/publications/road-transportation-of-defence-nuclear-material-in-scotland-preparedness-review

 

I would also like to personally thank the authors of the ‘Unready Scotland’ report and those members of the Scottish Parliament who raised and participated in the debate.

 

During the course of the review, there has been strong cross sector engagement and collaboration from a number of key agencies. I would like to personally thank the Police and Fire Inspectorates and colleagues from the Society of Local Authority Chief Executives in Scotland, who have worked tirelessly together to conduct the review within the agreed parameters and timescale, supported by Scottish Government Officials. The report is a testament to their commitment and dedication.

 

Following the parliamentary debate last May, the Scottish Government made a commitment to carry out a review of the consequence management planning, response and recovery aspects related to road transportation of Defence Nuclear Material in Scotland, led jointly by the Police and Fire Inspectorates. It would look at the close working arrangements with local authorities and the other responders in Scotland’s regional resilience partnerships to ensure that response arrangements are indeed up to date and current.

S5W-24067: Rona Mackay (Strathkelvin and Bearsden)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 27 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress has been made in evaluating the devolved employment service, Fair Start Scotland.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 28 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 28 June 2019

We will continue to publish statistics on Fair Start Scotland on a quarterly basis and our next evaluation report, focusing on the first full year of services up to March 2019, is due to be published in September.

This report identifies initial areas of success and for improvement across the first six months of service delivery (to Sept 2018), providing the first evidence of the Scottish approach to provision of employability services that treat people with fairness, dignity and respect and highlighting the actions being taken to improve longer term delivery.

The Scottish Government has proactively published information on its devolved employability services since December 2017 and is committed to the ongoing improvement of employment support in Scotland. Today, we are publishing the first report on Fair Start Scotland Evaluation: Implementation and Early Delivery Review. It is available in SPICe at BIB reference 60799.

Fair Start Scotland (FSS) is Scotland’s devolved employability support service and is designed to offer personalised support on a voluntary basis to help people, including those who are further removed from the labour market, who want help to find work and stay in work.

S5W-24057: Alex Neil (Airdrie and Shotts)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 26 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when the report from the Independent Review Panel that undertook a review of the process followed by NHS Lanarkshire Monklands Replacement/Refurbishment Project will be published.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 27 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 27 June 2019

 

We will continue to keep the progress of this important project under review.

Of the eight recommendations for Scottish Government, six relate to technical guidance in the Scottish Capital Investment Manual which will be reflected in the next update of the manual and the remaining two is for guidance to be updated, which is already in the process of being undertaken.

I have also asked that the option of re-providing on the existing site at Monklands be excluded from the re-evaluation as building a new hospital on an existing hospital site takes longer, costs more, risks infection and other patient safety issues, while creating performance and access issues during the long construction phase. There is therefore little point in including an option which will score poorly in the option appraisal process.

I have accepted the recommendations on adding independent members to the project board and developing a vision for the existing site. For the remaining recommendation on the site selection process, I have asked NHS Lanarkshire to broaden out the process and to work closely with the local planning authority to ensure that they can support and contribute to a more constructive, inclusive and open site option review with meaningful public engagement. This will mean that if there are any viable sites beyond Gartcosh and Glenmavis, they will be considered and it will ensure that the most appropriate site is identified through the option appraisal process and it is supported by the local community.

The report makes three recommendations for NHS Lanarkshire to implement and eight recommendations for the Scottish Government. The key recommendations relate to NHS Lanarkshire and they have been asked to make provision for new independent (external) members to join the project board, to re-evaluate the top two scoring options for the site selection and to develop a clear vision for the existing site which takes account of the local community.

I would also like to thank the members of the Independent Review Panel for preparing this report which has been helpful to me in deciding the way forward.

Firstly, I want to reiterate the Government’s commitment to the replacement of University Hospital Monklands to ensure the continuing provision of the highest quality healthcare services, for the benefit of local people.

https://www.gla.ac.uk/researchinstitutes/healthwellbeing/research/hehta/monklands/

The report will be published this morning at 11:00 on the University of Glasgow’s website and can be accessed through the following link:

S5W-24046: Shona Robison (Dundee City East)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 26 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will provide an update on the implementation of Fair Work First and the inclusion of environmental impact as a new element of the Scottish Business Pledge.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 27 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 27 June 2019

 

The review of the Scottish Business Pledge has been completed. The refreshed Business Pledge will align more closely with the fair work framework and will include environmental impact as an element of the Pledge for the first time. We are working to implement the key changes over the summer, with a view to launching the refreshed Scottish Business Pledge in the autumn.

  • extend Fair Work criteria to as many other grants, funding streams and business support budgets open to us, and
  • extend the range of Scottish Government and public sector contracts that Fair Work criteria will apply to.

 

We will publish an implementation plan for Fair Work First in late August setting out the further steps we will take to ensure that, by the end of this Parliament, and wherever it is appropriate to do so, we:

 

Grants issuing through the Fair Work budget for 2019-20 include Fair Work First criteria.

 

The Enterprise and Skills Agencies are adopting Fair Work First in their organisation, as set out in sponsorship arrangements through Ministerial strategic guidance for 2019-20. Ministers will shortly be writing to the Chief Executives of all public bodies setting out the Scottish Government’s expectation for them to adopt the terms of the Scottish Government’s Fair Work Agreement with the Civil Service Trade Unions and to attach Fair Work criteria to appropriate grants and funding streams.

 

Building on the Statutory Guidance for Addressing Fair Work Practices in Procurement (published in 2015), Fair Work First criteria has been included in the procurement process for a £400 million public sector facilities management contract. Bidders are being asked to demonstrate how they will adopt Fair Work practices for all workers engaged on the contract, over its 7-year duration.

 

As part of the initial implementation stage, starting from April 2019, Scottish Enterprise is attaching Fair Work criteria to a range of business support grants through Regional Selective Assistance and other job related grants. Grant recipients are being asked to demonstrate payment of the real Living Wage, no exploitative zero hour contracts and action to address the gender pay gap. Relevant grants are those over £100,000 which support Research and Development; Environmental Aid; Training Aid; Aid for Start-Ups and Aid for Disadvantaged and Disabled Workers. Ministers will be meeting with Scottish Enterprise in the Autumn to take stock of how they are taking forward this Programme for Government commitment and their plans for what more they might do.

 

  As set out in the Fair Work Action Plan we are taking a phased approach to the implementation of Fair Work First.

S5W-24018: Bob Doris (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 25 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what assessment it has made of the early introduction of the Scottish Child Payment to the current delivery programme of devolved benefits and Social Security Scotland.

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville on 26 June 2019

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville 26 June 2019

Scottish benefit

Previous delivery

Revised delivery

Best Start Foods

Summer 2019

No change

Funeral Support Payment

Summer 2019

No change

Young Carer Grant

Autumn 2019

No change

Job Grant

As soon as practicable

No change

Disability Assistance for Children & Young People (Child DLA)

Summer 2020

No change

Winter Heating Assistance for those in receipt of the highest component of Disability Assistance for Children and Young People

By end of 2020

No change

Scottish Child Payment early delivery (under 6s)

Work towards introduction by 2022

By March 2021

Disability Assistance for Older People

(Attendance Allowance)

By end of 2020

By 2021

Disability Assistance for Working Age People

(PIP)

Early 2021

No change

Additional payment to carers who look after more than one disabled child

Early 2021

No change

Winter Heating Assistance for over 65s (Winter Fuel Payments)

First payments by end of 2021

No change

Cold Spell Heating Assistance (Cold Weather Payments)

First payments by end of 2021

No change

Scottish Carer’s Allowance

By end of 2021

Early 2022

Scottish Child Payment full rollout (under 16s)

Work towards introduction by 2022

By 2022

 

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefits

Autumn 2022

No change

Transfer of existing cases from DWP to Social Security Scotland

Expected to be completed in 2024

Expected to be completed in 2025

 

Summary of potential changes to timetable for benefits delivery from 2020 on (originally announced in February 2019)

We believe that the change in the timetable for benefits delivery is worth it in order to introduce such a visionary, ambitious major policy as the Scottish Child Payment.

The Scottish Child Payment is a major commitment of this Government and Parliament. It has the potential to raise 30,000 children out of poverty and provide vital support to our lowest income families. And while its delivery will be challenging, its potential for helping some of the most vulnerable in our society is great.

The following table contains a summary of the changes we anticipate having to make to the previously announced timetable. This will be considered in more detail and dates finalised upon the conclusion of the formal impact assessment and I will update Parliament if these assumptions need to be changed.

We believe that these changes provide the right balance between introducing a new benefit that can make a substantial contribution to reducing child poverty, and securing a smooth transition for the other benefits to be delivered.

We remain on track to introduce Funeral Support Payment and Young Carer Grant in 2019; Disability Assistance for Children and Young People in summer 2020; and Disability Assistance for Working Age People, our replacement for Personal Independence Payment, in early 2021.

These adjustments will ensure that we are able to provide the new payment to the timescales we have announced today, but also that we will mitigate some of the risks this could create for the wider social security programme.

Our initial analysis shows there will be an impact on the delivery of two devolved benefits. The introduction of Disability Assistance for Older People will now move into 2021 rather than winter 2020, and it is likely that Scottish Carer’s Allowance will be introduced in early 2022 rather than at the end of 2021. In addition, the transfer of cases from DWP to Social Security Scotland is now likely to take until 2025.

We have worked hard to examine the introduction of the Scottish Child Payment in the context of the current delivery programme and we will carry out further formal impact assessment on the delivery of the new payment over the summer. In advance of that, however, we know that there are certain changes that will in all probability need to be made.

In terms of the current delivery programme, the safe and effective delivery of social security remains of the utmost importance. In their recent report, “Social security: Implementing the devolved powers” , Audit Scotland noted that “Given the emphasis on safe and secure delivery and the complexity and scale of work ahead, it is difficult to see how the programme could progress more quickly” (para 94, pg 29). Accordingly, in deciding to take forward such a substantial commitment as the Scottish Child Payment, sooner than planned, we know that we will need to make adjustments to the current social security delivery programme to accommodate the introduction of this new benefit.

In regards to Social Security Scotland, the early introduction of the Scottish Child Payment will mean that there needs to be an increase in the original number of staff to be recruited by Social Security Scotland in order to deliver the new payment. Their on-boarding and training will be incorporated into existing recruitment and estates planning.

As Audit Scotland has recently highlighted, the next phase of devolved benefits delivery will be considerably more challenging and complex. Delivering an additional benefit by the end of 2022, within the lifetime of the current Tackling Child Poverty Delivery Plan, will be a challenge, but one we believe is well worth it in order to pursue our bold ambitions to reduce child poverty. We have also said that we want to introduce this new payment early for families with a child under 6, to take meaningful early action to reduce child poverty.

The Scottish Child Payment has the potential to be a transformative measure for children and families in poverty. It is in line with the principles of Scotland’s social security system which includes that social security is an investment in the people of Scotland and is to contribute to reducing poverty in Scotland.Delivery of the Scottish Child Payment will take place at the same time that the Scottish Government is also taking over delivery responsibility for many of the benefits devolved under the Scotland Act 2016, including the complex disability and carer benefits.

S5O-03446: Liam Kerr (North East Scotland)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 19 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much has been spent of the £308 million that it plans to allocate to social security by 2022-23.

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville on 26 June 2019

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville 26 June 2019

The costs of implementing the Social Security programme for financial year 17-18 were published as part of the Scottish Government’s consolidated accounts on 27 September 2018, the costs were £21 million. The consolidated accounts for financial year 18-19 are still being finalised and will be published in due course.

The Financial Memorandum made it clear that the £308 million was an initial estimate for a four year programme which could change materially.

S5O-03454: Kezia Dugdale (Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 19 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what assessment it has made of tax flight since the introduction of the new income tax rates.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 26 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 26 June 2019

 

I take the issue of behavioural effects and loss of tax revenue very seriously. That is why I have asked the Council of Economic Advisers to consider any potential behaviour effects beyond the work they have done on the Top Rate of Tax. Our tax policies strive to create a balance between raising revenue and ensuring progressivity.

S5W-23727: Iain Gray (East Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what national policy guidelines there are regarding the provision of key worker housing for social care workers, including for older people's services.

Answered by: Kevin Stewart on 25 June 2019

Answered by: Kevin Stewart 25 June 2019

 

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23726 on 25 June 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at: http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .

S5W-23994: Rona Mackay (Strathkelvin and Bearsden)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 24 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will respond to Fit for the Future – Report of the Independent Review of Legal Services Regulation in Scotland.

Answered by: Ash Denham on 25 June 2019

Answered by: Ash Denham 25 June 2019

The Scottish Government response will be published today on the Scottish Government website at 9:30am.

S5W-23691: Finlay Carson (Galloway and West Dumfries)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the financial implications are of the delay in appointing a bidder for R100.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 25 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 25 June 2019

 

There are no financial implications.

S5W-23758: Peter Chapman (North East Scotland)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 13 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it plans to bring forward regulations to review the charging arrangement for the recovery, removal and storage of vehicles.

Answered by: Humza Yousaf on 25 June 2019

Answered by: Humza Yousaf 25 June 2019

 

Regulations to introduce a new pricing matrix for the removal, storage and disposal of vehicles will be laid before Parliament on 26 June 2019 with a coming into force date of 10 October 2019.

S5W-22176: Finlay Carson (Galloway and West Dumfries)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 14 March 2019

To ask the Scottish Government by what date it will announce the contractor for the R100 project, and when work on the project will commence.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 25 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 25 June 2019

 

The appointment of a preferred bidder (or bidders) is anticipated to take place by the end of September of this year, with contracts to be awarded by the end of this year. The detail of the work programmes will be determined once the contracts are awarded.

S5W-23726: Iain Gray (East Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what national policy guidelines there are regarding key worker housing for older people.

Answered by: Kevin Stewart on 25 June 2019

Answered by: Kevin Stewart 25 June 2019

 

Local authorities as the statutory housing authority for their area are responsible for assessing housing need and demand based on the findings from their Housing Need and Demand Assessment and setting out how the requirement for housing will be met thought their Local Housing Strategy (LHS) and Strategic Housing Investment Plans (SHIP). Where evidence suggests that there is requirement for action to provide suitable housing for key workers such as those employed in health or care sectors, education of broader service provision, the Scottish Government would expect the LHS and SHIP to reflect this.

S5W-23995: Linda Fabiani (East Kilbride)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 24 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it has reached a decision on the way forward for civil partnership in Scotland, following the consultation in 2018.

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville on 25 June 2019

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville 25 June 2019

 

The Scottish Government response to the consultation is being published on the Scottish Government website. The Scottish Government will also publish shortly the analysis of the consultation responses and the responses we have permission to publish.

The extension of civil partnership to mixed sex couples will provide everyone in Scotland with the same choices should they decide to enter into a legally recognised relationship. This promotes equality of choice and human rights.

We have listened carefully to the views expressed by the people and organisations who responded to this consultation. We believe that opening up civil partnership to mixed sex couples is the best way to remove the ECHR incompatibility from the current law.

The Scottish Government has decided to introduce legislation to the Scottish Parliament in autumn this year that will make civil partnership available to mixed sex couples.

The Scottish Government received 481 responses to the consultation.

The Scottish Government consulted in response to a declaration by the UK Supreme Court that the current law of civil partnership was incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights to the extent that it prevents mixed sex couples from entering into civil partnerships. The decision by the UK Supreme Court is at https://www.supremecourt.uk/cases/uksc-2017-0060.html

The Scottish Government consulted on the future of civil partnership from 28 September 2018 to 21 December 2018. The consultation can be found at https://consult.gov.scot/family-law/the-future-of-civil-partnership-in-scotland/

S5W-23773: Monica Lennon (Central Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 14 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-23613 by Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019, what action it will take in response to the recommendations in the RCGP Scotland report, From the Frontline, and within what timescale.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 24 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 24 June 2019

I am scheduled to meet with the RCGP in August to discuss the report’s findings in more detail.

S5W-23728: Tavish Scott (Shetland Islands)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much (a) Historic Environment Scotland, (b) Orkney Islands Council and (c) Highlands and Islands Enterprise contributed toward the upgrade of the car parking facilities at the Stone of Stenness in Orkney.

Answered by: Fiona Hyslop on 24 June 2019

Answered by: Fiona Hyslop 24 June 2019

The upgrading of car parking facilities at the Stones of Stenness was one of three pilot projects supported by the Scottish Government's Rural Tourism Infrastructure Fund. The Scottish Government has provided £80,000 towards the total cost of the work which is being delivered by Orkney Islands Council. Historic Environment Scotland has contributed an additional £100,000. Highlands and Islands Enterprise has not contributed towards this project. In addition to the contribution that Orkney Islands Council are making in delivering the project, we understand that it intends to utilise a portion of the residual funding from a fund it established to support its World Heritage Sites.

S5W-23929: George Adam (Paisley)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 19 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will provide an update on funding for NHS employers' pension costs, and whether the cost will be fully funded by the UK Government.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 20 June 2019

 

I can confirm today that the Scottish Government will provide additional funding of £48.4 million to meet the increased pension costs for the NHS in Scotland, including GPs and hospices that are members of the NHS pension scheme. By doing this we will continue to prioritise and protect frontline health services in Scotland.

The UK Government has taken decisions on pension costs and funding that result in a shortfall of £48.4 million for the NHS in Scotland. This comes on top of a reduction to health funding of £55 million applied through the UK Budget, and therefore a total future shortfall for Scotland of over £100 million per year.

S5O-03429: Colin Beattie (Midlothian North and Musselburgh)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 12 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of the reported 5% increase in crime in the area, what its position is on whether Midlothian Council’s disbandment of its community safety teams is in the public interest and appropriate.

Answered by: Ash Denham on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Ash Denham 20 June 2019

 

The Scottish Government recognises that local community safety structures and approaches rightly vary based on local circumstances, and it is for Midlothian Council to decide what is best for the local area.

While there was a small increase in crimes of attempted murder and serious assault recorded by police in Midlothian in 2017-18 compared to 2008-09, recorded statistics for Midlothian show that crime recorded by the police has fallen by a fifth over the same period.

The Scottish Government remains committed to tackling crime across Scotland. Over the last decade official statistics show that recorded crime in Scotland has fallen by more than a third, with a 43% decrease in violent crime.

S5O-03430: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 12 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it is taking to reduce and phase out the use of plastic cutlery and straws in the public sector.

Answered by: Roseanna Cunningham on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Roseanna Cunningham 20 June 2019

The Scottish Government is committed to reducing use of single use plastics. The EU Single-Use Plastics Directive will lead to a ban on these items across the EU and we continue to look at how we can lead by example following our ban of single use beverage cups from the Scottish Government estate. Zero Waste Scotland provides a range of tools and supports that can assist any public sector organisation looking to make progress on these issues.

S5W-23708: Jamie Greene (West Scotland)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 10 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the publication under FoI of its paper, A737 Dalry Bypass: cost-benefit assessment: EIR release (FOI/18/02139), what the source was of the information that was provided, and how the figure of £53 million in VAT was calculated.

Answered by: Michael Matheson on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Michael Matheson 20 June 2019

The construction cost, which is the figure usually quoted in public information about the project, is £31.2 million exclusive of VAT.

The figure of £53 million inclusive of VAT was an estimate for the construction cost, together with other project costs including purchase of land, public utilities diversions, advisor fees and preliminary works such as geotechnical and environmental surveys. An allowance was also made for risk, optimism bias and inflation in line with guidance in The Green Book, published by HM Treasury.

As part of development of the scheme in line with the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges, our advisors produce cost estimates, consistent with Treasury Guidance, which are regularly updated throughout the design development process as well as before award of the construction contract, once final costs are confirmed.

The information was based on advice given by our technical advisors (Mouchel Fairhurst Joint Venture).

S5W-23715: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 10 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what recent discussions it has had with the Department of Transport regarding the integration of HS2 into the Scottish railway system.

Answered by: Michael Matheson on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Michael Matheson 20 June 2019

 

The North of HS2 to Scotland Working Group (comprising representatives from Transport Scotland, the Department for Transport, HS2 Ltd and Network Rail) was set up in 2016 to deliver the Scottish and UK Governments' joint commitment to identify potential infrastructure improvements that could be implemented over the next 10 years to improve the capacity, resilience and journey time on the rail routes between Scotland and England. This Group meets every two months, with the next meeting scheduled for 3 July 2019. The group has been examining options on both the East and West Coast routes to Edinburgh and Glasgow.

S5O-03428: Sandra White (Glasgow Kelvin)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 12 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what measures are in place to address the housing needs of older people.

Answered by: Kevin Stewart on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Kevin Stewart 20 June 2019

We are investing more than £3.3 billion in affordable housing to deliver at least 50,000 affordable homes over the lifetime of this Parliament. 99% of homes [3,758 of 3,810] built by housing associations and councils in 2017-18 through our Affordable Housing Programme met Housing for Varying Needs standards. That means they are flexible and can be easily adapted to meet the needs of older and disabled people.

This Government champions independent living for older people within their community. Living in the right home with the right support can be the key to enabling people to live safely and independently at home. Last year, in partnership with COSLA, we launched Age, Home and Community: The Next Phase, the refreshed housing strategy for Scotland’s older people, which sets out 22 actions to ensure older people have the right advice, the right home and the right support.

S5W-23651: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what percentage of medical graduates need to become GPs to address the reported GP shortage.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 20 June 2019

AY 15-16

AY 16-17

AY 17-18

AY 18-19

AY 19-20

AY 20-21

848

898

898

953

1,013

1,038

 

We have also announced 85 additional medical school places to be shared between three universities: Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow. The new courses will focus on general practice offering a new route for experienced healthcare professionals to enter medicine. 25 of these places will be available at the University of Edinburgh.

To meet the goal of increasing the numbers of GPs by 800 in the next ten years, we need to take a number of actions, including increasing the number of medical places at universities, and taking steps to encourage medical graduates to choose general practice. To that end, between 2015-16 and 2020-21 the Scottish Government will have increased the annual intake of medical places in Scottish universities from 848 to 1038 (190 places, a 22% increase) including funding Scotland’s first Graduate Entry Medical programme (scotGEM) and widening access places.

S5W-23677: Linda Fabiani (East Kilbride)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what impact Brexit could have on the operation of family law in Scotland.

Answered by: Ash Denham on 20 June 2019

Answered by: Ash Denham 20 June 2019

 

In relation to family law, there are a number of international Conventions, known as the Hague Conventions, which provide a reasonable fall-back if the EU measures should cease to apply to Scotland.

To ensure that necessary provision is in place, the Scottish Government has made Scottish Statutory Instruments to take effect if the UK should leave the European Union without a deal, including in relation to the Brussels IIa Regulation and the equivalent provision for same sex relationships. The Scottish Government has also consented to a number of UK Statutory Instruments at Westminster, including in relation to the Maintenance Regulation. The Justice Committee has published a report on the secondary legislation on civil (including family) and criminal law it has considered to date in relation to a potential no deal Brexit. This report is at https://sp-bpr-en-prod-cdnep.azureedge.net/published/J/2019/5/3/What-a--no-deal--Brexit-means-for-civil-and-criminal-law-in-Scotland---a-summary-of-subordinate-legislation-considered-by-the-Justice-Committee-to-date-1/JS052019R12Rev1.pdf

The EU Regulation on simplifying the requirements for presenting certain public documents (Regulation 2016/1191) has just come into force. This Regulation simplifies the requirements for presenting certain public documents in the EU, such as birth, marriage or death certificates.

The EU Regulation on the mutual recognition of protection measures in civil matters (Regulation 606/2013) is a measure to protect those at risk of domestic abuse by recognising civil protection measures (e.g. interdicts) across the EU.

The EU Maintenance Regulation (Regulation 4/2009) contains jurisdictional rules for maintenance claims and provision on recognising and enforcing spousal and child maintenance orders and binding maintenance agreements.

The EU Brussels IIa Regulation (Regulation 2201/2003) covers matters such as the mutual recognition across the EU of divorce and parental responsibility judgments; jurisdiction in these cases; and child abduction. This Regulation is currently being re-cast, with the revised Regulation due to come into force in 2022. It is uncertain at this stage whether or not the re-cast Regulation will apply to Scotland.

EU measures have not generally made provision which affects the substance of family law. Instead, they have tended to concentrate on areas such as the mutual recognition of judgements across the EU. This has provided welcome certainty and clarity for families. Details on various EU measures are outlined below.

S5W-23610: Mary Fee (West Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will provide a breakdown of the costs associated with the early learning and childcare recruitment campaign that was launched in 2017, and what analysis and evaluation it has made of the outcomes.

Answered by: Maree Todd on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Maree Todd 19 June 2019

The data we get from the evaluation data helps us to refine and maximise performance of the campaign as it progresses. For example, upweighting budget towards audiences or marketing channels which we can see are delivering best impact.

  • 255,100 sessions
  • 198,864 users
  •  686,315 page views

Since the ELC Recruitment campaign launched in October 2017, up until the end of May 2019, the website stats show there have been:

  • The campaign has generated good levels of recognition across the target audience, but this was particularly high amongst parents potentially interested in changing jobs/career (57% at the second post wave).
  • The campaign has prompted action for a good proportion, with 50% of Parent Changers who have seen the campaign claiming action as a result at the second post-wave.
  • Likelihood to consider a job or course in ELC or already be working in the sector rose from 42% to 48% over the campaign period among Parent Changers.
  • Attitudes towards ELC among Parent Changers were generally positive and stable, with a significant increase over the campaign period in agreement that it is ‘a varied role’ (from 65% to 71%) and ‘a career that would be suitable for me’ (from 42% to 55%).
  • The campaign led to 23% awareness of the website across the total target audience, rising to 27% among Parent Changers.

Burst Two

  •  73% of the total target audience recognised the campaign, peaking with S4 girls (at 88%).
  •  There was an increase pre to post in the proportion of those in the target audience who reported to definitely/probably see themselves applying for a job in a nursery at the end of school year OR definitely/probably considering going to college to take a qualification in ELC, by end of February 2018. The increase was largest amongst those in S4 (+9 percentage points) and particularly amongst girls in S4 (+18pp).
  • The campaign increased the number of those agreeing with the statement ’I could make a positive difference to children’s lives’. This went up 5pp amongst the total audience, up 11pp amongst those in S4 and up 13pp amongst S4 girls.
  • The campaign led to 24% awareness of the website across the total target audience.
  • The campaign has prompted action (e.g. visited the website, applied for a college course/job) for a good proportion, especially S4 girls, with 41% of those who have seen the campaign claiming action as a result.

Burst One

Key findings across each burst are as follows.

Burst Two (May – July 18, January – February 19, targeting a “career seeker” audience - 22-44 year-olds in the BC1C2D demographic) was evaluated with three waves of research (one prior to campaign launch (May 2018), one in June 2018 and one in February 2019). At each wave, a sample of c.300 adults in Scotland aged 22-44 in the BC1C2D socio-economic groups (excluding students) who were considering changing jobs or going back to work was interviewed.

Burst One (October 17 – February 18, targeting S4 and S5 pupils) was evaluated using online self-completion surveys undertaken in the classroom among selected schools pre and post campaign. Schools were selected to achieve a mix of urban and rural areas; with emphasis on those with out-of-home activity. 14 schools took part at pre-wave; 12 also took part at post-wave, plus a further six at post-wave. A pre-wave was carried out in September/October 2017 and a post-wave in February/March 2018.

The campaign itself is evaluated via pre and post campaign evaluation research in terms of levels of awareness, recognition and attitudes related to the marketing. This is carried out by an independent research agency.

The Marketing campaign is one lever that will contribute towards the recruitment of the required workforce.

Evaluation

Budget reconciliation is currently taking place for the 2018-19 spend and will be published in due course.

The spend for 2017-18, including the costs related to the Early Learning and Childcare Recruitment campaign, can be found via the following link: https://www.gov.scot/publications/marketing-spend-2017-2018/

The Scottish Government publishes its total marketing spend annually.

S5W-23649: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many NHS staff are not employed on full-time contracts.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 19 June 2019

71,257 NHS staff, as at 31 Mar 2019, were on part-time contracts.

S5W-23690: Finlay Carson (Galloway and West Dumfries)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what steps it has taken to ensure that there will be no further delay in appointing a bidder for R100.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 19 June 2019

The steps already taken to engage in dialogue throughout the process and to consider carefully any requests from potential bidders for extensions to timelines have been designed to limit the potential for any additional delay to the process.

S5W-23645: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many people under 65 have received free personal care since it was extended to include this group.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 19 June 2019

Legislation for the extension came into effect on 1 April 2019. To enable us to provide an accurate overview of the impact of the extension, we need to obtain data over an appropriate period of time greater than 12 weeks. Therefore, our first report which will include the number of people under the age of 65 who have received free personal care will be available in early 2020.

S5W-23737: Oliver Mundell (Dumfriesshire)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government for what reason the review of standardised national assessments did not ask specific questions regarding additional support needs.

Answered by: John Swinney on 19 June 2019

Answered by: John Swinney 19 June 2019

The Independent Review of P1 SNSA did not specifically include questions relating to additional support needs because this was not identified as a particular issue in relation to P1 assessments when the remit for the review was being developed. Only a small number of those responding to the Review raised additional support needs as an issue. SNSA are designed to be as inclusive as possible. An Accessibility Advisory Group continues to provide valuable assistance in ensuring the SNSA are accessible to children. Teachers are empowered to exercise their professional judgment on whether it is appropriate for children with ASN to be presented with the SNSA.

S5W-23746: Dean Lockhart (Mid Scotland and Fife)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 12 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much of the £500 million Scottish Growth Scheme has been allocated to Scottish companies, broken down by year.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 19 June 2019

Year

Invested

No.of Companies

2017

£22.7 m

24

2018

£83.5 m

58

2019

£19.1 m

76

Total

£125.3 m

158

 

The following table contains a breakdown by year.

To 31 May 2019, under the Scottish Growth Scheme, some £125.3 million has been invested in 158 companies.

S5W-23896: Alex Neil (Airdrie and Shotts)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 18 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-23747 by Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019, what progress it has made on improvements resulting from the short-life working group on support for women with complications from transvaginal mesh.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 19 June 2019

All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .

In the interim, for patients with mesh complications who have contacted the Scottish Government directly about their care I have asked that their cases be directed to the appropriate Accountable Officer within their health board area. I have been clear in my expectations the Accountable Officer will provide responses to each patient as quickly as possible and to support any woman who wishes to have a second opinion on their proposed care. Members should note that an NHS Board Accountable Officer in this regard is the Medical Director or their nominee.

The group is working to enhance care pathways for patients with complications within individual boards to be enhanced, with each board tasked with setting out how this will be achieved – including the need for improved co-ordination with primary care services.

The group has also begun work to establish a national complex case review unit within the NHS in Scotland. This will be taken forward through our service design processes with a view to being established as soon as is practicable.

The group considered feedback on patient experience and care pathways. The Chair of the group has been in contact with Dr Dionysios K. Veronikis on my behalf and to obtain his agreement for specialists from Scotland to visit him and observe his expertise in his own clinic in the USA. We are also seeking to bring him to Scotland for a period of time to provide treatment, expert advice, and training. Such an arrangement would be subject to agreement and regulatory approval. As regulation in this area is reserved I have written to the UK Government’s Health Secretary and the General Medical Council (GMC) to highlight this case. The Chair of the group has already reviewed requirements and regulations stipulated by the GMC for visiting senior clinicians.

The Short Life Working group on mesh complications met for a third time last week (Friday 14 June) to examine what additional steps could be taken support women with mesh complications, including on the removal of mesh where clinically appropriate.

As I outlined in S5W-23747 that while the short-life working group is expected to publish its initial findings in the autumn, I would provide an update on what improvements could be made now.

S5W-23574: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 3 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the outcome was of the National Planning Board meeting in May 2019 that considered proposals for the delivery of a national thrombectomy service for stroke patients, and what the timetable is for the roll out of this service.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 19 June 2019

Until the plan is finalised, costs and timescales will not, and cannot be known. However, the Scottish Government has made clear that investment will be made available.

The Board agreed that ensuring the current interventional neuroradiology service has the necessary strong foundations and components in place is a necessary condition for the future provision of a safe and effective specialist thrombectomy service. Given the international shortage of interventional neuro-radiologists, one of the critical elements of a future service is the recruitment and retention of those specialists.

The National Planning Board considered the next stage of the proposals for the establishment of a Scottish thrombectomy service at their meeting in May 2019. The proposals have been designed and developed by the Directors of the Planning Thrombectomy Advisory Group and their work is ongoing to design a national plan.

S5W-23707: Liam McArthur (Orkney Islands)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 10 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the publication in June 2018 of the report, Scottish greenhouse gas emissions 2016, whether it can provide a breakdown of which companies or other parties in each sector were responsible for the most emissions.

Answered by: Roseanna Cunningham on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Roseanna Cunningham 19 June 2019

The Scottish Government does not hold company-level emissions data. The Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) maintains records of emissions from individual installations in Scotland when these exceed reporting thresholds. These data are published in the Scottish Pollutant Release Inventory and are made available on the SEPA website.

S5W-23641: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much it has awarded in the last year to organisations that have applied to it for funding.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 19 June 2019

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23640 on 19 June 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .

S5W-23683: James Kelly (Glasgow)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much it has spent through the aided places scheme to support pupils at St Mary’s Music School in Edinburgh in each year since 2008, also broken down by how many pupil placements this has funded.

Answered by: John Swinney on 19 June 2019

Answered by: John Swinney 19 June 2019

School Year

Total Aided Places Scheme Payment

2007-08

£1,229,012

2008-09

£1,230,590

2009-10

£1,314,143

2010-11

£1,331,924

2011-12

£1,234,258

2012-13

£1,252,891

2013-14

£1,258,398

2014-15

£1,281,259

2015-16

£1,289,134

2016-17

£1,273,622

2017-18

£1,302,598

2018-19

£1,298,825*

*The figure for 2018-19 is provisional and will be confirmed in the School’s final claim for 2018-19 which is due to be submitted in August 2019.

 

In every year shown, this funding has supported 51 pupils, comprising 45 instrumentalists (which includes up to 33 boarding pupils) and 6 choristers.

The payments made by the Scottish Government through the St Mary’s Music School Aided Places Scheme since the 2007-08 school year are listed in the following table.

S5W-23661: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the statement in the recent Royal College of General Practitioners report, From the Frontline, that the proportion of NHS spending allocated to general practice should be raised to 11% from the current 7.75%.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 19 June 2019

The Scottish Government is increasing investment in primary care by £500 million over the lifetime of the Parliament. This will take spending on primary care to at least £1.28 billion and to 11% of the frontline NHS budget by 2021-22. As part of this commitment, £250 million will be in direct support of general practice.

S5W-23662: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of the recent Royal College of General Practitioners report, From the Frontline, how it plans to develop an information campaign that informs the public of changing care models and supports GPs and their teams to deliver more effective care to patients.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 19 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 19 June 2019

As I stated in Parliament on 24 April 2019, the Scottish Government is currently working with the RCGP and others to consider how this proposal might best be taken forward.

S5W-23684: Richard Lyle (Uddingston and Bellshill)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what stock assessments will be undertaken of Scotland’s wild wrasse populations.

Answered by: Fergus Ewing on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Fergus Ewing 18 June 2019

 

Wrasse data currently being collected will help improve our understanding of the fishery and inform the design of data collection for the development of stock assessments. Marine Scotland Science have appraised the requirements for stock assessment methods already undertaken in other parts of the world for data limited stocks and are in the process of exploring how these emerging wrasse fisheries can best be assessed in the Scottish context.

Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation (SSPO) entered into a voluntary management arrangement with the Scottish Government in May 2018. These measures apply to all fishers catching wrasse supplying SSPO members, and lay the foundations of an evidence base in better understanding these species, a pre-requisite in undertaking any form of stock assessments.

S5W-23603: Jamie Halcro Johnston (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of its commitment in its Economic Action Plan 2018-20 to publish its Future Skills Action Plan "in early 2019", by what date this will be published.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 18 June 2019

 

I look forward to updating Parliament on our plans to publish the Future Skills Action Plan in the very near future.

It is crucial that the plan is fully aligned with the delivery of the Strategic Board’s Strategic Plan, and work the Board and its agencies are developing to drive forward our shared ambitions for skills provision to better support inclusive and sustainable economic growth. This work must also take cognisance of the economic and labour market conditions into which the Future Skills Action Plan will be delivered, with the significant negative impacts of Brexit across Scotland’s economy and labour market, a primary and obvious concern.

We continue to work with stakeholders, including the Enterprise and Skills Strategic Board and the agencies, to develop the Future Skills Action Plan.

S5W-23602: Lewis Macdonald (North East Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-23336 by Michael Matheson on 4 June 2019, whether it will publish the data collected by traffic counters on the former A90 and the AWPR on which its initial information on traffic flow and journey time analysis have been based.

Answered by: Michael Matheson on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Michael Matheson 18 June 2019

There are currently no plans to publish the traffic count data as this is only initial information collected since the opening of the AWPR/B-T project. As explained in my previous answer, Transport Scotland will be undertaking an evaluation of the project, in line with Scottish Trunk Road Infrastructure Project Evaluation (STRIPE) Guidance which will be published in due course. The evaluation will be carried out to assess the impact of the scheme by comparing conditions one year and then three years after opening with forecasts made during scheme design and development. As a project of this size and scale, an additional evaluation will be undertaken five years after opening and the findings of the STRIPE will be published.

S5W-23674: Ross Greer (West Scotland)

Scottish Green Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether (a) Scottish Enterprise and (b) Highlands and Islands Enterprise can turn down an application for enterprise funding following the outcome of a human rights due diligence check of the company under consideration for support.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 18 June 2019

 

I have passed your query on to Steve Dunlop and Carroll Buxton, the Chief Executives of SE and HIE respectively, and asked them to respond to you directly.

This is an operational matter for Scottish Enterprise (SE) and Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE).

S5W-23627: Alexander Stewart (Mid Scotland and Fife)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many NHS staff have received training about autism in the last year, broken down by NHS board, and what its position is on whether (a) there is a need to accelerate the implementation of this training and (b) such training should be mandatory.

Answered by: Clare Haughey on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Clare Haughey 18 June 2019

Mandatory training is reserved to training where there is a statutory requirement to undertake such training.

The Scottish Government recognises the need to ensure that health professionals have the knowledge and skills in autism relevant to their role. We are working with NHS Education Scotland whose role it is to provide support to NHS Boards by developing and delivering education and training for those who work in NHSScotland. The learning space on autism provides a range of resources to support the workforce.

This information is not centrally held.

S5W-23738: Rachael Hamilton (Ettrick, Roxburgh and Berwickshire)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it plans to extend the cap on transitional relief for non-domestic rates.

Answered by: Kate Forbes on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Kate Forbes 18 June 2019

The Scottish Government put in place a transitional relief from 2017-18 to cap the annual year on year increase in rates bills at 12.5% real terms, for all but the largest hospitality across Scotland and Aberdeen city and Shire offices. In 2018 the Scottish Government confirmed that transitional relief would be maintained for eligible properties for the full five-year period between the 2017 and the 2022 revaluations.

S5W-23581: Brian Whittle (South Scotland)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress it has made in taking forward the proposals in its document, A Manufacturing Future for Scotland, published in 2016, and what the outcomes were of the re-shoring pilot projects detailed in the document.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 18 June 2019

 

Outcomes expected include: helping SE and HIE to identify how to support wider participation in global manufacturing supply chains, using supply to Scottish-based tier 1 manufacturers as a launch-pad to international success, through innovations in processes, materials and products; and informing a new SE/HIE supply chain development product which can be rolled out across all manufacturing sectors.

  • The Scottish Government has committed £48 million towards the development of the National Manufacturing Institute Scotland (NMIS) and we are establishing an £8.9 million Lightweight Manufacturing Centre which will be a significant first step in NMIS delivery.
  • Zero Waste Scotland (ZWS) launched a Circular Economy Investment Fund which has funded projects to a value in excess of £1.3 million. In addition, ZWS have also launched an enhanced Circular Economy Support Service to provide SME businesses across all sectors in Scotland with a tailored consultancy service to help them explore more circular ways of doing business.
  • The first call of the Advancing Manufacturing Challenge Fund (AMCF), which will utilise £14 million of European Regional Development Funding (ERDF), was launched on 29 May 2019. AMCF aims to have a significant impact on advancing the manufacturing capabilities of SMEs leading to long-term transformational change.
  • Scottish Enterprise (SE) launched a Capital Asset Review service delivered by the Scottish Manufacturing Advisory Service (SMAS). To date, over 600 reviews have been carried out to support manufacturers to develop future-proofing investment plans. This total figure includes 64 Manufacturing 4.0 Reviews which help businesses identify and evaluate the opportunities for them around digital technologies.
  • Skills Development Scotland has reviewed sectoral Skills Investment Plans with significant manufacturing components and is developing a skills plan as part of NMIS
  • Over 300 leaders have participated in manufacturing best practice visits as a part of the Smart Excellence Programme to develop and promote knowledge and experience sharing.
  • The re-shoring pilot projects identified did not proceed for commercial reasons but wider work, managed by SE and Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE), is being carried out to support more Scottish companies to achieve supply chain excellence as outlined in the Manufacturing Action Plan (MAP). SMAS is working closely with a portfolio of 10-15 Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) tier 1 companies across aerospace, energy, space and pharmaceuticals on local supply chain development challenges, analysis and intervention strategies.

There has been significant progress made since the Manufacturing Action Plan – A Manufacturing Future for Scotland – was published in February 2016 including:

S5W-23676: Jamie Halcro Johnston (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether individual placement and support provision under schedule 1 of the Fair Start Scotland Specification and Service Levels is measured monthly via a random sample of service providers caseload management records and, if so, what the findings of this reporting has been, including (a) how many are people are accessing it and (b) what the geographic availability is.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 18 June 2019

 

The Scottish Government will publish information on Fair Start Scotland’s Individual Placement and Support provision, uptake and delivery when it reports to Parliament later this year.

We regularly monitor providers on their performance as part of our quality assurance process to ensure that key performance indicators (KPIs) and key delivery indicators (KDIs) are met. IPS provision is measured via a random sample of Service Providers’ caseload management records.

S5W-23775: Mark Griffin (Central Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 14 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-23532 by Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019, whether the GP contract limits the fees that can be charged.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 18 June 2019

Where a patient requests a report or certificate falling outside the GP contract, the BMA advises that the fee set should be reasonable, transparent and justifiable. Patients should also be forewarned of the fee level before the service is agreed and provided.

The GP contract recognises that GPs perform some services for their patients that are not covered by the contract. As such the contract does not limit or set fees for these services.

S5W-23685: Richard Lyle (Uddingston and Bellshill)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it plans to publish data on any stock assessments of Scotland's wild wrasse populations.

Answered by: Fergus Ewing on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Fergus Ewing 18 June 2019

 

Wrasse data currently being collected will help improve our understanding of the fishery and inform the design of data collection for the development of stock assessments. Marine Scotland Science have appraised the requirements for stock assessment methods already undertaken in other parts of the world for data limited stocks and are in the process of exploring how these emerging wrasse fisheries can best be assessed in the Scottish context.

Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation (SSPO) entered into a voluntary management arrangement with the Scottish Government in May 2018. These measures apply to all fishers catching wrasse supplying SSPO members, and lay the foundations of an evidence base in better understanding these species, a pre-requisite in undertaking any form of stock assessments.

S5W-23673: Ross Greer (West Scotland)

Scottish Green Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether (a) Scottish Enterprise and (b) Highlands and Islands Enterprise can turn down the business support services that it provides following the outcome of a human rights due diligence check of the company under consideration for support.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 18 June 2019

 

I have passed your query on to Steve Dunlop and Carroll Buxton, the Chief Executives of SE and HIE respectively, and asked them to respond to you directly.

This is an operational matter for Scottish Enterprise (SE) and Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE).

S5W-23719: Rhoda Grant (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 10 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action NHS boards are (a) taking and (b) expected to take to increase the diversity of their workforce.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 18 June 2019

The Scottish Government is taking action to increase the diversity of our NHS workforce by funding partnerships with the Business Disability Forum and Stonewall Scotland. We have also committed to delivering an NHS Scotland wide campaign to promote more effective equalities outcomes.

This includes a Public Sector Equality Duty that requires NHS boards to have due regard to advance equality of opportunity between people who share a relevant protected characteristic and those who do not.

Action NHS Boards are (a) taking and (b) expected to take to increase the diversity of their workforce are matters for each individual NHS board within the framework of the current legislative requirements under the Equality Act 2010, and the Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012.

S5W-23600: Neil Findlay (Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-23350 by Derek Mackay on 4 June 2019, whether it will provide the information that was requested regarding whether the cabinet secretary registered the meeting and dinner that he attended in Cannes in March 2019 and, if so, on what date he registered this.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 18 June 2019

The Scottish Government can confirm that Private Offices arrange for the basic facts of formal meetings between Ministers and outside interest groups to be recorded, setting out the reasons for the meeting, the names of those attending and the interests represented. A monthly list of engagements carried out by all Ministers is routinely published three months in arrears (as per the Scottish Ministerial Code, Section 4.22 & 10.18).

S5W-23666: Mark Griffin (Central Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much the Social Security Directorate has paid to IBM (a) under the Low Income Benefits Agile Service Design contract since 1 November 2018 and (b) for other services.

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Shirley-Anne Somerville 18 June 2019

The financial data requested falls within financial years 2018-19 and 2019-20. We have not yet finalised our financial accounts for those years, and these remain subject to external audit, so we are not able to provide this information at this time. Our annual report and accounts will be published shortly.

S5W-23718: Rhoda Grant (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 10 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many NHS boards have published annual workforce data for (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2018-19.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 18 June 2019

Workforce data for all 22 NHS boards for 2017-18 and 2018-19 is published on the workforce section of NHS National Services Scotland's Information Services Division (ISD) website: https://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Workforce/ .

S5W-23717: Rhoda Grant (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 10 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what figures are used for benchmarking NHS boards equality and diversity data, and whether the figures are nationally or locally based.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 18 June 2019

The Regulations impose specific duties on Scottish public authorities to publish a set of Equality Outcomes at four yearly intervals and thereafter to report on progress every two years.

Decisions relating to benchmarking equality and diversity data are matters for each individual NHS board within the framework of the current legislative requirements under the Equality Act 2010 and the Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012. This includes a Public Sector Equality Duty that requires NHS boards to have due regard to advance equality of opportunity between people who share a relevant protected characteristic and those who do not.

This data is broken down nationally, regionally and by NHS boards to provides figures for benchmarking and comparison purposes.

Data on equality and diversity is published on an annual basis in June within the workforce section of NHS National Services Scotland's Information Services Division (ISD) website: https://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Workforce/ .

S5W-23671: Donald Cameron (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what consideration it has given to introducing the spatial management measures for the wild wrasse fishery similar to those that have been introduced elsewhere in the UK, including by the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority.

Answered by: Fergus Ewing on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Fergus Ewing 18 June 2019

 

Wrasse data currently being collected will help improve our understanding of the fishery and inform future management measures. We have no plans at present to introduce spatial management measures, but will continue to work closely with fishers and partners such as Scottish Natural Heritage, and keep the existing measures under review.

Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation (SSPO) entered into a voluntary wild wrasse management arrangement with the Scottish Government in May 2018. These measures apply to suppliers to SSPO members catching wrasse and lay the foundations of an evidence base in better understanding these species.

S5W-23723: Alison Johnstone (Lothian)

Scottish Green Party

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of the plans by the NHS genomic medicine service in England to do so from 2020; whether it plans to roll out whole genome sequencing for children with undiagnosed conditions and, if so, when.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 18 June 2019

 

Experience and evidence gained from this investment along with growing evidence from other sources will inform long-term strategy and help develop effective delivery of the most appropriate testing methodology within routine service.

This investment will build on previous investment, current practice and experience gained in genomic technologies; including the continued development of genomic tests, ongoing collaboration between the Scottish Genomes Partnership and Genomics England using whole genome sequencing to help provide a diagnosis for NHS Scotland patients with an undiagnosed rare disease, as well as improved data analysis, sharing and storage.

The Scottish Government’s Programme for Scotland 2018-19 has a commitment to continue the development of genomics medicine in Scotland. This includes an investment of £4.2 million towards the enhancement of NHS Scotland genetic capabilities for the diagnosis of rare diseases.

S5W-23594: Neil Findlay (Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government who carried out the Scottish Prison Service job evaluation scheme; whether consultants were involved with it and, if so, how much they were paid; how much the scheme cost each year; what analysis it has carried out of its impact, and whether it will provide a breakdown of the scheme's achievements, including the savings that it returned.

Answered by: Humza Yousaf on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Humza Yousaf 18 June 2019

 

While impact assessments cannot be completed until a Job Evaluation Scheme has been finalised and posts are matched to pay bands, an impact assessment for any unlawful bias is carried out throughout the development stage. The purpose of a new Job Evaluation Scheme is to determine the relative importance of a number of different jobs through a systematic, consistent and gender neutral approach. Savings will not be achieved through a new Job Evaluation Scheme.

Over recent years, SPS has carried out work internally to develop a new Job Evaluation Scheme in partnership with recognised trade unions. Due to the specialist nature of the work, a Reward Analyst was recruited through an Employment Agency to carry out a range of reward tasks, including technical support for a new Job Evaluation Scheme. The cost of the Reward Analyst, for all of their work including Job Evaluation, was £96,379 in 2017-18 and £71,167 in 2018-19. This includes the Employment Agency fee and VAT.

SPS use a Job Evaluation Scheme known as Equate, which was developed by KPMG in 1995 and incurs no annual cost. Although Equate continues to meet its purpose, SPS is keen to explore a possible replacement which will meet the requirements of the Service moving forward.

I have asked Colin McConnell, Chief Executive of the Scottish Prison Service (SPS), to respond. His response is as follows:

S5W-23705: Liam McArthur (Orkney Islands)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 10 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-21383 by Clare Haughey on 21 February 2019, what the estimated timeline is, broken down by quarter, for it fulfilling the commitment in its Mental Health Strategy to hire 800 additional mental health professionals, and what it estimates the final proportional allocation will be, broken down by (a) A&E, (b) custody suite, (c) GP, (d) prison and (e) other settings.

Answered by: Clare Haughey on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Clare Haughey 18 June 2019

As planning around workforce evolves and can change for a variety of reasons, it would therefore not be appropriate to set out a final allocation per setting in advance of 2022.

As part of the Reporting Framework with Integration Authorities, we receive quarterly updates from them which form the basis of the national update provided on the Scottish Government website.

We expect to have over 800 additional mental health workers within the key settings of this commitment by 2022.

S5W-23593: Neil Findlay (Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it expects the Scottish Prison Service to have a budget shortfall in 2019-20 and, if so, how much.

Answered by: Humza Yousaf on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Humza Yousaf 18 June 2019

 

The Scottish Government budget 2019-20 provided SPS with a Resource Allocation of £312.2m, Non-cash of £34.0m and a Capital Allocation of £47.5m.

S5W-23632: Willie Rennie (North East Fife)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government for which financial years it has requested a compensating transfer for the spillover effect arising from the increase in the personal tax allowance, as stated in the Medium Term Financial Strategy published on 30 May 2019.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 18 June 2019

 

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23630 on 19 June 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx

S5W-23675: Jamie Halcro Johnston (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 7 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether the financial penalty for Fair Start providers that fail to deliver individual placement and support has been removed from the Fair Start Scotland Quality and Compliance Decision Making Log and, if so, for what reason.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 18 June 2019

 

There have been no changes to the Fair Start Scotland Quality and Compliance Decision Making Log in relation to Individual Placement and Support.

S5W-23601: Neil Findlay (Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-23350 by Derek Mackay on 4 June 2019, in light of the comment by the cabinet secretary that “we are transparent about details of ministerial engagements and events, and routinely publish this information online as per the Scottish Ministerial Code, section 10.18”, whether details of the meeting and dinner that he attended in Cannes in March 2019 have been published and, if so, (a) where and (b) on what date.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 18 June 2019

The Scottish Government can confirm that as this event took place in March 2019 the expectation is that this will be published in line with normal practice on the Scottish Government website by the end of June 2019. In the meantime details of the dinner of 12 March 2019 was released under the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002 under reference number FoI/19/01118. This was published on the Scottish Government website on 22 May 2019.

S5W-23630: Willie Rennie (North East Fife)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it requested consideration of a compensating transfer for the spillover effect arising from the increase in the personal tax allowance, as stated in the Medium Term Financial Strategy published on 30 May 2019.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 18 June 2019

 

The Chief Secretary to the Treasury and I agreed a detailed process for considering spillover effects in December 2017, which came into effect in 2018-19. I wrote to the Chief Secretary to the Treasury on 4 April 2019 presenting estimates that the Scottish Budget was around £30m worse off in 2018-19 and around £70m worse off in 2019-20 as a result of increases in the personal allowance. This correspondence followed discussions between officials of the Scottish Exchequer and HM Treasury, in accordance with paragraph 53 of the Fiscal Framework Agreement. It did not consider the impact in 2017-18 as this predated the agreement on direct spillover effects coming into force. The Fiscal Framework Agreement requires that any decision or transfer relating to a spillover effect must be jointly agreed by the Scottish and UK Governments, as must the understanding of the evidence on which estimates are made.

S5W-23635: Mary Fee (West Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many female apprentices completed an apprenticeship in each local authority area in 2018-19.

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Jamie Hepburn 18 June 2019

Local Authority

Female

Aberdeen City

207

Aberdeenshire

285

Angus

206

Argyll & Bute

98

Clackmannanshire

110

Dumfries & Galloway

169

Dundee City

270

East Ayrshire

157

East Dunbartonshire

122

East Lothian

171

East Renfrewshire

72

Edinburgh, City of

577

Falkirk

303

Fife

556

Glasgow City

904

Highland

525

Inverclyde

118

Midlothian

173

Moray

124

Na h-Eileanan Siar

29

North Ayrshire

234

North Lanarkshire

679

Orkney Islands

32

Perth & Kinross

253

Renfrewshire

293

Scottish Borders

155

Shetland Islands

41

South Ayrshire

156

South Lanarkshire

517

Stirling

154

West Dunbartonshire

179

West Lothian

322

Outwith Area

16

Total

8,207

Skills Development Scotland calculate achievement as follows:

Achievements are counted when a claim for payment has been made and approved in the financial year. Therefore, the achievement rate is the number of certificated leavers registered in the financial year as a percentage of all MAs registered as leavers on the system.

Leavers are counted when a leaving date is entered on the system and the MA has not re-joined the programme within 8 weeks. The exception to this rule is where an MA achieves and progresses to a higher-level MA – this leaver is counted regardless of the re-start timescale but the individual is not counted as a new start.

There can be flux in achievements year on year due to the varying length of Modern Apprenticeships, which are delivered at the pace of the learner and the needs of the business. Comparing achievements by year can suggest improvement/ regression on progress, but is only a reflection of an increase/ reduction of leavers in said financial year. When considered as a percentage for 2018/19 female achievement rate nationally was 76%, compared to 77% for males. Achievements are important, but should be considered in tandem with new starts and in-training figures to give a holistic picture.

 

Female apprenticeship achievements for 2018-19 in each local authority area are as follows:

S5W-23625: Alexander Stewart (Mid Scotland and Fife)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what information it has received from the Autism Strategy Review Group regarding how NHS boards train staff about autism.

Answered by: Clare Haughey on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Clare Haughey 18 June 2019

 

NHS Education Scotland (NES) is the special board responsible for supporting NHS Boards in education and training. We have commissioned NES to support boards by providing autism training and resources. We meet NES regularly to discuss training however, individual boards are responsible for ensuring their workforce has the relevant training appropriate to their role.

S5W-23631: Willie Rennie (North East Fife)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its estimate is of the necessary compensating transfer for the spillover effect arising from the increase in the personal tax allowance, as stated in the Medium Term Financial Strategy published on 30 May 2019, and how this compares with the estimate used in the answer to question S5W-00400 by Derek Mackay on 15 June 2016.

Answered by: Derek Mackay on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Derek Mackay 18 June 2019

 

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23630 on 19 June 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx

S5W-23597: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-21526 by Richard Lochhead on 7 March 2019, whether it will provide this information for each of the last five years, also broken by institution.

Answered by: Richard Lochhead on 18 June 2019

Answered by: Richard Lochhead 18 June 2019

I refer the member to Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) Bib number: 60751.

S5W-23564: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 3 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether the landlords of purpose-built student housing with fewer than 30 bedrooms can let these to non-students under the Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016.

Answered by: Kevin Stewart on 17 June 2019

Answered by: Kevin Stewart 17 June 2019

The matter of who a landlord lets to would be an individual issue for them to consider, taking into account any other restrictions or agreements which they or the property may be subject to.

The specific provisions set out in the 2016 Act relating to PBSA are to ensure that only a specific type of student let is exempt from the new tenancy. The Act sets out that student accommodation is exempt if the planning permission for that accommodation stipulates that it has to be used predominately for housing students; and the provider of the accommodation has at least 30 bedrooms in one building, or as part of a complex. Any other student let, which does not have the characteristics as set out in Schedule 1 of the 2016 Act, will not be exempt from the private residential tenancy regime.

The Private Residential Tenancy replaces the Assured Tenancy system set out in the Housing (Scotland) Act 1988. Accommodation provided to students by a specified educational institution was exempt from the Assured and Short Assured Tenancy regime under the terms of the 1988 Act, and this is the same under the 2016 Act. Purpose built student accommodation (PBSA) is also exempt from the private residential tenancy because it does not form part of the mainstream PRS, as PBSA providers effectively act as private providers of ‘halls of residence’ accommodation. This enables PBSA providers to continue to fulfil their obligations under nomination agreements to accommodate students from Higher and Further Education Institutions.

Schedule 1 of the Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016 (‘the Act’) sets out a list of Tenancies which cannot be private residential tenancies ( http://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2016/19/schedule/1/enacted ).

S5W-23618: Neil Findlay (Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body when it last reviewed its rules regarding holding events that are hosted by external organisations.

Answered by: Liam McArthur on 17 June 2019

Answered by: Liam McArthur 17 June 2019

 

In light of the requirements introduced by the Lobbying (Scotland) Act in 2017 for organisations to record all regulated lobbying activity; together with developments around how people and organisations engage with the Parliament since the original events and exhibitions policy and guidance was introduced parliamentary officials have already been reviewing these policies and guidance with a view to ensuring they are still relevant, appropriate and consistent with our wish to encourage and facilitate the widest possible engagement.  Once this has been considered by the SPCB later this year, the SPCB will update all Members on the new guidance.

 

The SPCB last reviewed the guidance regarding holding events by external organisations in June 2018 - when it took a decision to cease the commercial events pilot.

S5W-23579: Claudia Beamish (South Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what information it has regarding how many times planning authorities have made orders each year under the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997 to prohibit the resumption of planning permission if no development has taken place for two years, including in the case of peat extraction sites.

Answered by: Kevin Stewart on 17 June 2019

Answered by: Kevin Stewart 17 June 2019

The Scottish Government is not aware of any prohibition orders being made by planning authorities under paragraph 3 of Schedule 8 to the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997.

S5W-23565: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 3 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government for what reason it concluded that the minimum let property and other properties together must include at least 30 bedrooms to qualify as student housing under the Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016 and, in light of reported concerns that this approach might discriminate against small business investors, whether its position is on amending section 5(4)(b) of Schedule 1 of the Act.

Answered by: Kevin Stewart on 17 June 2019

Answered by: Kevin Stewart 17 June 2019

The Scottish Government currently have no plans to amend section 5(4)(b) of Schedule 1 of the Act.

Research, at the time, found that the smallest PBSA building in Scotland housed ‎ 35 students and therefore a minimum of 30 bedrooms was found to be a reasonable limit in order to distinguish PBSA from normal Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMO) properties, that students often share. Landlords of students who live in properties in the mainstream private rented sector (including HMOs) do not have the same obligations as PBSA landlords to provide term time accommodation for Higher and Further Education Institutions. Students living in mainstream rented properties are not a homogenous group, and so Parliament confirmed the Scottish Government’s policy approach that they must be afforded the same level of security as other tenants living in the sector.

The intention behind setting a condition of a minimum number of bedrooms within Purpose Built Student Accommodation (PBSA), is to clearly distinguish PBSA accommodation from large flats let to students by landlords who are not PBSA providers. During the passage of the Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Bill through Parliament, a Stage Three amendment was brought forward which saw the minimum number of bedrooms within the definition of PBSA, increase from 15 to 30.

S5W-23731: Annie Wells (Glasgow)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will publish a business and regulatory impact assessment for its proposed legislation to restrict the promotion and marketing of products high in fat, sugar and salt.

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick 14 June 2019

A Business and Regulatory Impact Assessment would be published alongside the introduction of any draft legislation.

S5W-23730: Annie Wells (Glasgow)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it will define products that will be subject to restrictions on the promotion and marketing of products high in fat, sugar and salt.

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick 14 June 2019

The Scottish Government will reflect on the responses to its consultation Reducing health harms of foods high in fat, sugar or salt in considering the foods that would be subject to any relevant restrictions.

S5W-23652: Brian Whittle (South Scotland)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress is being made towards a national database/audit for fracture liaison services in Scotland similar to the Fracture Liaison Service Database (FLS-DB) in England and Wales.

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick 14 June 2019

There is no national database for fracture liaison services, however, all health boards have pathways and processes to allow patients to be referred for diagnostics and treatment where clinically appropriate.

S5W-23372: Donald Cameron (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 22 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when Transport Scotland will meet stakeholders to discuss the introduction of road equivalent tariff fares on ferry routes between Gourock and Dunoon.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 14 June 2019

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23373 on 14 June 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx

S5W-23732: Annie Wells (Glasgow)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what consideration it has given to the effect on Scottish businesses of its proposed legislation to restrict the promotion and marketing of products high in fat, sugar and salt.

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick 14 June 2019

The Scottish Government will reflect on the responses to its consultation and ongoing work to develop impact assessments, including the BRIA, in considering what actions to take.

The consultation paper Reducing health harms of foods high in fat, sugar or salt included questions on business impact and support. In parallel, officials have engaged with industry to support the development of a Business and Regulatory Impact Assessment (BRIA), providing industry with an opportunity to explain and quantify the economic impact of the proposals. This work is ongoing.

S5W-23370: Donald Cameron (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 22 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what discussions Transport Scotland has had with CalMac regarding maintaining late night weekend sailings between Gourock and Dunoon.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 14 June 2019

Transport Scotland has had no formal discussions with CalMac regarding maintaining the late night weekend sailings between Gourock and Dunoon. Formal discussions have focused on bringing the service into the Clyde and Hebrides Ferry Service contract. We continue to engage with local stakeholders on investment to improve the resilience and reliability of the service, increase patronage and to enable an upgrade to passenger facilities.

S5W-23621: Willie Rennie (North East Fife)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much funding it provided to each education institution in each of the last three years for (a) medical student and (b) nurses’ training places, and how much it plans to provide in each of the next three years.

Answered by: Richard Lochhead on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Richard Lochhead 14 June 2019

Table 1: Funding for Medical students’ places

2016-17 (£)

2017-18 (£)

2018-19 (£)

Aberdeen, University of

9,074,682

9,451,262

9,553,772

Dundee, University of

8,070,006

7,826,073

8,039,271

Edinburgh, University of

10,247,245

10,375,802

9,777,119

Glasgow, University of

13,239,634

13,474,532

13,980,763

St Andrews, University of

1,540,618

1,598,536

1,862,677

Total

42,172,187

42,726,206

43,213,604

Includes Scottish Graduate Entry Medicine (ScotGem) places, clinical training cost for rUK students and assumed level of fees for SAAS.

Includes pre-clinical and clinical training costs

Table 2: Funding for Nursingand Midwifery students’ places

2016-17 (£)

2017-18 (£)

2018-19 (£)

Abertay Dundee, University of

998,445

1,162,070.

1,270,566

Dundee, University of

8,168,202

8,074,563

8,591,081

Edinburgh Napier University

11,488,785

11,798,514

12,269,807

Edinburgh, University of

944,160

1,064,637

1,081,073

Glasgow Caledonian University

11,273,157

11,397,736

12,905,092

Glasgow, University of

1,108,989

1,346,478

1,383,599

Highlands and Islands, University of the

0

936,390

1,905,846

Open University in Scotland

287,835

357,720

554,489

Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh

973,049

1,252,377

1,421,411

Robert Gordon University

6,498,954

7,010,290

8,013,933

Stirling, University of

7,051,737

5,784,009

5,340,801

West of Scotland, University of the

13,880,181

14,283,549

15,867,276

Total

62,673,494

64,468,333

70,604,974

Source: SFC

Includes, cost of honours year paid directly to institutions, pilot course delivered by the Open University in Scotland and assumed fees paid via SAAS.

Intake numbers for Nursing and Midwifery for 2019-20 will not be confirmed until the end of this financial year in March 2020 and Medical places for the same academic period will be confirmed by the end of this calendar year. Future intake figures for 2020-21 and 2021-22 have not been agreed and are not available.

The Scottish Government has provided over £325 million in funding for medical, nursing and midwifery places in the last three years.

S5W-23563: Willie Coffey (Kilmarnock and Irvine Valley)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 31 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much it has invested in transport infrastructure in the south west of Scotland in the last decade.

Answered by: Michael Matheson on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Michael Matheson 14 June 2019

Transport

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Total

Projects

£m

£m

£m

£m

£m

£m

£m

£m

£m

£m

£m

A75 Dunragit

0.1

0.1

2.2

20.1

2.2

0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0

25.3

A75 Hardgrove

0.1

0.3

0.9

9.5

4.8

0.5

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

16.2

A75 Cairntop

1.5

6.2

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

8.2

A77 Symington

0.5

0.6

1.2

0.2

12.5

0.0

0.2

0.2

0.0

0.1

15.5

A77 Parkend

0.0

5.4

2.2

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

7.6

A77 Maybole

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.6

0.7

0.1

0.1

0.7

1.0

2.2

5.4

Bus Investment

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.3

A737 maintain

1.3

1.4

1.6

1.7

1.0

0.8

1.4

2.1

1.8

2.5

15.7

A738 maintain

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.2

0.5

0.1

0.1

1.3

A75 maintain

6.7

5.3

5.3

8.2

7.5

7.1

6.8

9.8

9.1

10.5

76.3

A751 maintain

0.3

0.1

0.1

0.4

0.1

1.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

2.2

A76 maintain

4.1

7.0

3.4

4.4

2.4

2.9

2.8

4.5

5.2

7.3

44.0

A77 maintain

4.7

4.8

4.0

5.6

4.6

4.7

4.3

5.8

10.1

7.5

56.2

M77 maintain

0.7

0.8

0.7

0.9

0.9

0.3

0.8

0.4

1.4

0.4

7.4

A74(M) charges

31.6

29.9

31.9

32.4

28.3

29.9

39.2

54.2

52.5

54.5

384.4

M77 charges

8.6

8.4

8.8

8.6

10.2

9.7

9.8

12.5

11.9

12.2

100.7

Kilmarnock rail

28.5

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

28.5

Kilmarnock stn

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

2.8

2.8

Timber transport

0.8

3.2

0.1

0.6

0.6

0.3

0.3

0.2

1.9

1.1

9.1

Low carbon

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.8

0.8

Electric vehicle

0.0

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.0

0.0

0.1

1.5

2.6

TOTAL

89.6

73.9

62.9

93.5

75.9

58.1

66.7

91.2

95.2

103.6

810.5

Details of how much the Scottish Government has invested in transport infrastructure in the south west of Scotland in the last decade are shown in the following table. This excludes the amount invested in maintaining and renewing the railway in this area, as it is not possible to allocate the proportion of the several hundred million that we provide to Network Rail each year to undertake this on our behalf for the whole Scotland route.

S5W-23371: Donald Cameron (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 22 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how marine fuel has been used by (a) CalMac, (b) Argyll Ferries and (c) NorthLink Ferries in each of the last five years.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 14 June 2019

There are a range of uses to which marine fuel has been put during each of the previous five years: marine fuel has been used by CalMac Ferries, Argyll Ferries and Serco NorthLink Ferries to fuel propulsion via the main engines and bow thrusters; to fuel the operation of vessels’ auxiliary electricity generators; and in order to power on-board boilers for heating. Marine fuel is also currently used as the fuel for the engines of lifeboats and Fast Rescue Craft.

S5W-23729: Annie Wells (Glasgow)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 11 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will publish the results of its consultation, Reducing health harms of foods high in fat, sugar or salt: consultation, and what action it plans to take in response to restrictions on the promotion and marketing of products that are high in fat, sugar and salt.

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick 14 June 2019

The Scottish Government will reflect on the consultation responses in considering what actions to take.

An analysis of consultation responses will be published by the autumn.

S5W-23121: John Finnie (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Green Party

Date lodged: 13 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22844 by Paul Wheelhouse on 10 May 2019, for what reason the trades unions will be engaged only in discussions with the advisory board but not be represented on it, and what its response is to calls for it to review the membership of the board, including to consider inviting union participation.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 14 June 2019

Following consideration, the decision was taken to retain the membership of the previous Expert Ferry Group when it was renamed the Ferry Industry Advisory Group.

We will also be consulting the trades unions on our next Vessel Replacement and Deployment Plan report and are engaging with them, through CalMac, on the specification of the new Islay ferry. Looking ahead, I expect discussion of the next Ferries Plan to be a recurring item in our ongoing dialogue with the trades unions.

As explained in the answer to the member’s previous question (S5W-22844), I meet with the STUC, and all the key unions with an interest in ferry services on a quarterly basis to discuss a range of relevant matters. That important engagement will continue and enables the trades unions to input advice directly to me.

S5W-23379: Tom Mason (North East Scotland)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 22 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it measures progress with carbon capture.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 14 June 2019

We continue to press the UK to develop the necessary policy framework that industry needs to deliver CCUS. Indeed, earlier this month, Cabinet Secretary for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform Roseanna Cunningham wrote on our joint behalf to Claire Perry MP, Minister of State at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) inviting the UK Government to accelerate deployment of fully operational carbon capture utilisation and storage facilities. We are keen to work with the UK Government to develop the technology and, indeed, we helped BEIS to host the Carbon Capture and Utilisation Summit here, in Edinburgh, in November 2018.

A combination of existing infrastructure, supply chain skills, strategically important industrial clusters, and access to vast CO2 storage potential means we are ideally placed to play a key role in its deployment and this is particularly true for North East Scotland.

It is clear that carbon capture and storage will play a very important role in helping the UK reach net-zero emissions domestically, and Scotland remains the best-placed country in Europe to realise CCUS on a commercial scale. Both the International Energy Agency and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have both concluded that CCS and CCUS will be necessary for global efforts to limit global average temperature increases to 4 degrees Celsius or lower and the technology will be essential to reach higher ambition, as under the Paris Agreement.

Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, has declared a “Climate Emergency”, and the Scottish Government has responded to advice from the UK Committee on Climate Change (CCC) with the publication of an amendment to the Climate Change Bill that will mean greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Scotland must reduce reach net-zero by 2045.

There are no commercial scale Carbon Capture Utilisation Storage (CCUS) facilities operational in the UK at present. This situation arises as a consequence of the cancellation of UK Government financial support to progress Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Projects at both Longannet and Peterhead power stations – decisions opposed by Scottish Ministers.

S5W-23373: Donald Cameron (Highlands and Islands)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 22 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government by what date road equivalent tariff fares will be introduced on ferry routes between Gourock and Dunoon.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 14 June 2019

We will need to obtain the Commission’s views on that complaint before considering the implications for implementation of RET on the Gourock – Dunoon service.

However it must be noted that a State aid complaint has been made to the European Commission about our proposals to introduce RET on the Pentland Firth, so we should not underestimate the challenges involved.

My officials and I attended a meeting with stakeholders on 16 April 2019 in Dunoon and committed to further consideration of fares requirements. Officials are conducting analysis around fare options and impacts.

S5W-23638: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will publish the hepatitis C elimination strategy, and what the reason has been for the reported three-year delay in doing so.

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick on 14 June 2019

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick 14 June 2019

A great deal of work has been done by NHS Procurement and Boards to get medicine to the people who need it most. HPS data shows that, between 2013 and 2016, we delivered a 39 per cent reduction in the incidence of decompensated cirrhosis in people with chronic hep C. This is a clear indication that the Scottish Government’s current commitment to eliminating serious disease associated with hepatitis C is working.

Scottish Government officials are working with Health Protection Scotland and NHS Boards to agree treatment targets which will see Scotland reach elimination well in advance of the World Health Organisation target of 2030.

S5W-23644: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many incidents of bullying in the NHS have been reported in each year since 1999.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 13 June 2019

Following John Sturrock`s report into allegations of a bullying culture in NHS Highland we have asked all health boards in Scotland to consider the findings and look again at the effectiveness of their own internal processes for handling concerns, leadership and governance.

NHS Scotland Boards have advised us that 232 formal bullying and harassment cases were raised during 2018-2019 (1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019).

Boards first provided this information to the Scottish Government in their 2018-19 annual Staff Governance Monitoring return.

S5W-23647: Miles Briggs (Lothian)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many additional (a) council-run and (b) private care beds there have been in each local authority area in each year since 1999.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 13 June 2019

The annual difference in the number of registered care home places by local authority can be calculated using these tables.

For years 2015-2017, see data table 4 published on 11 September 2018.

For years 2000-2014, see data table 4 published on 28 October 2014.

Information has been published for 2000 to 2017. Within the publication, information is available on the number of registered places for ‘Local Authority and NHS’ and ‘private sector’ care beds.

https://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Health-and-Social-Community-Care/Care-Homes/Previous-Publications/index.asp .

The Scottish Care Homes Census published by ISD Scotland provides information on the number of registered care home places for adults in each local authority area in Scotland at 31 March;

S5W-23571: Monica Lennon (Central Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 3 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what steps it has taken to develop data collection regarding eligibility and waiting times for social care since the publication of its paper, Eligibility Criteria and Waiting Times, in 2010.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 13 June 2019

The Scottish Government is continuing to work closely with Local Authorities to improve the quality and consistency of data to show the eligibility and waiting times to assess and provide social care. A national programme to support local reform of adult social care support is being developed from the expertise and experiences of people who use and work in social care support. Although the co-production is still underway to form the programme’s scope and activity, one of the emerging priorities we have identified is to review the data we collect on social care support and how it is used.

The Scottish Government continues to collect and publish data on eligibility criteria and waiting times on an annual basis; https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Health/Data/QuarterlySurvey.

Since the publication of the Eligbility Criteria and Waiting Times paper in 2010, the Scottish Government has worked closely with Local Authorities to improve the quality of the data collection and understand variations within their returns. Data continued to be submitted to the Scottish Government on a quarterly basis until 2014. As analysis showed there was little variation in waiting times between quarters, a decision was made to move to an annual collection to help reduce the burden of supplying data on Local Authorities. From 2018, the collection was expanded to include people aged under 65.

S5O-03390: Jenny Gilruth (Mid Fife and Glenrothes)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much pupil equity funding has been spent in the Mid Fife and Glenrothes constituency since its introduction.

Answered by: John Swinney on 13 June 2019

Answered by: John Swinney 13 June 2019

Pupil Equity Funding, part of the £750m Scottish Attainment Challenge, is giving additional resources to schools across the country so that they provide targeted support for their children, families and who most need it.

Detail of spend for 2018/19 is still being collected and will be published later this year.

Schools in the Mid Fife and Glenrothes Constituency reported spending £1,205,966 of their Pupil Equity Funding in 2017/18.

S5W-23633: Mary Fee (West Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government by what date NHS Health Scotland and NHS Education Scotland will publish the knowledge and skills framework and workforce development plan for mental health and suicide prevention.

Answered by: Clare Haughey on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Clare Haughey 13 June 2019

The Workforce Development Plan is being finalised and will be made available on the NES Turas Learning Platform by the end of June.

The Knowledge and Skills Framework was made available at the end of May 2019 on the NES Turas Learning Platform and is accessible by all NHS staff.

S5W-23663: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the statement in the recent Royal College of General Practitioners report, From the Frontline, that practices in deprived areas must be more adequately represented in undergraduate teaching and postgraduate training for GPs.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 13 June 2019

The SG has also funded 60 new places at Aberdeen and Glasgow Universities, both of which will offer placements in GP Deep End practices.

In terms of undergraduate teaching, recommendations of the Increasing Undergraduate Education in Primary Care Group, chaired by Dr John Gillies, will be published shortly. The report will make recommendations with a view to increasing the number of undergraduate teaching practices including in areas of deprivation.

We agree that practices in deprived areas must be adequately represented in undergraduate and postgraduate training for GPs. That is why the SG offers 20K GPST bursaries for “hard to fill” posts. “Hard to fill” includes areas of socio-economic deprivation. 101 bursary posts filled in 2018, an increase of 41 from 2017.

S5W-23665: Lewis Macdonald (North East Scotland)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much funding it has provided toward research on (a) strokes, (b) heart disease, (c) cancer, (d) hearing loss and (e) sight loss in each year since 2014.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 13 June 2019

 

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

a) Stroke

£1,443,000

£2,340,000

£811,000

£1,455,000

£1,215,000

b) Heart disease

£881,000

£447,000

£341,000

£372,000

£1,088,000

c) Cancer

£2,272,000

£2,678,000

£3,216,000

£2,271,000

£818,000

d) Hearing loss

£504,000

£353,000

£356,000

£343,000

£392,000

e) Sight Loss

£12,000

£12,000

£180,000

£14,000

£14,000

The figures (rounded to the nearest thousand) combine: the funding committed to research projects and fellowships in these areas awarded in the given year; commitments to co-funded initiatives with medical research charities; annual allocations to the clinical research networks for stroke, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and ophthalmology; and annual contributions to the Institute of Hearing Research. 2019 data are not available.

The Scottish Government’s Chief Scientist Office (CSO) provides funding to support health research in Scotland. The level of CSO funding that can be directly attributed to support research on a) stroke, b) heart disease, c) cancer, d) hearing loss and e) sight loss in each year from 2014 to 2018 is given in the following table.

S5W-23745: Kenneth Gibson (Cunninghame North)

Scottish National Party

Date lodged: 12 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it still plans to return Glasgow Prestwick Airport to the private sector.

Answered by: Michael Matheson on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Michael Matheson 13 June 2019

Good progress continues to be made by GPA to increase revenue; deliver operating efficiencies; and pursue exciting opportunities for the future including Spaceport. In light of that progress, GPA will shortly place an advert in the Official Journal of the European Union inviting expressions of interest in GPA. Any proposals submitted as a result of the advert would be considered carefully before any decision was taken to divest our shareholding in GPA or any part of it. We will provide an update to Parliament should any credible expressions of interest be received, while respecting the need to maintain confidentiality for commercial reasons.

Since the Scottish Government bought Glasgow Prestwick Airport (GPA) in 2013, we have been clear that it is our intention to return the business to the private sector when the time is right. The senior management team at GPA has continued to engage with potential buyers and investors to discuss proposals for developing the business under new ownership.

S5W-23598: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 4 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government for what reason the MS drug, Ocrevus (ocrelizumab), is not available in Scotland.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 13 June 2019

It should be noted that the decision to make a submission to the SMC is purely one for the manufacturer. SMC decisions are made independently of Ministers and the Scottish Parliament, which is important because it means that decisions on whether to accept newly licensed medicines are based on clinical and cost-effectiveness at a national population level for all Scotland.

The Scottish Government hopes to see a further submission from the manufacturer, Roche, to the SMC at the earliest opportunity for the primary progressive multiple sclerosis indication and we are aware that the SMC has been in regular contact with the manufacturer regarding their submission plans.

Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) was accepted by the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) in December 2018 for restricted use in adult patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis where the patient has active disease.

S5W-22978: Finlay Carson (Galloway and West Dumfries)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 2 May 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it is taking to ensure that lessons have been learned from any previous failures to roll-out community broadband for rural communities.

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Paul Wheelhouse 13 June 2019

The lessons learned from this process have helped to shape the design of the R100 programme. Primary amongst those lessons was the need to continue engagement with communities and suppliers to ensure their voices are heard. The result has been an extensive and ongoing engagement process, with R100 officials visiting all parts of Scotland to speak with stakeholders, and with the objective of ensuring that no communities are left behind.

The Community Broadband Scotland (CBS) initiative helped to support a number of successful community-run networks across Scotland. However, an extensive review of how best to deliver continued support to such networks concluded that – despite its successes – the CBS model was no longer the most viable approach, not least because of constraints around state aid challenges. Communities within the project pipeline were given the option of continuing with their own projects or being included in planning for our £600 million Reaching 100 percent programme (R100), and the vast majority of communities indicated a preference to wait for the R100 rollout, give the commitment to deliver services at superfast speeds of 30 Megabits per second or better.

Of course, it has been a challenge to deliver broadband infrastructure improvements to some of the most remote and rural areas, especially given the fact that all regulatory and legal responsibility for telecommunications in the UK rests solely with the UK Government, under the provisions of the Scotland Act 1998.

The Digital Scotland Superfast Broadband (DSSB) programme has been very successful, delivering truly transformative results across all 32 Scottish Local Authorities, with fibre broadband access extended to over 930,000 homes and businesses across Scotland – many of these in remote and rural locations – with over 26,800 premises in the constituency of Galloway and West Dumfries alone.

S5W-23626: Alexander Stewart (Mid Scotland and Fife)

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party

Date lodged: 5 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government which NHS boards have established a recording system to monitor staff learning and training about autism, and what analysis is made of the effectiveness of each system.

Answered by: Clare Haughey on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Clare Haughey 13 June 2019

This information is not centrally held by the Scottish Government and is a matter for individual NHS Health Boards. We expect all boards to monitor and record training and development undertaken by their staff. With respect to autism training, the NHS NES Autism Training Framework supports them to identify the level of training required by staff relevant to their role.

S5W-23656: Alex Cole-Hamilton (Edinburgh Western)

Scottish Liberal Democrats

Date lodged: 6 June 2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the statement in the Royal College of General Practitioners report, From the Frontline, that GPs should have a minimum of four years' competency-based training that includes 25% of study time embedded within practice, which is a rise from the current 8% of study time embedded within practice over three years.

Answered by: Jeane Freeman on 13 June 2019

Answered by: Jeane Freeman 13 June 2019

The Scottish Government also agrees with the need to increase the learning time medical undergraduates spend within GP practices, but this is dependent on a range of factors, and is an issue under active consideration by the increasing undergraduate education in primary care group Chaired by Dr John Gillies, and which is due to report shortly.

We are also supporting a number of pilots designed to enhance the competencies of GPs to assist them become more competent, confident practitioners with the skills to work within integrated care services. The emphasis is on GPs who have completed their training, thereby meeting the increasing demand for more flexible career options, complementing integrated service delivery models, and helping to support retention. The pilots will be evaluated and the results shared.

The Scottish Government agrees with the College that there’s a need to enhance the quality, content and locations in which competency-based GP training is delivered, and work is already underway to deliver such improvements, within the existing GMC-approved 3 year training programme, with a particular focus on acquiring the relevant capabilities defined by the College and required by the GMC.